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Peer2Peer Finance News | September 19, 2019

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Zopa shows how to play your cards right in new illustrations

Zopa shows how to play your cards right in new illustrations
Jordan Bintcliffe

ZOPA has released a series of illustrations aiming to educate consumers about how best to utilise financial tools.

In its latest blog post, the light-hearted pictures liken credit and debit cards to a football team, to teach consumers about the differences between the two types of cards.

They are part of a series of illustrations Zopa has commissioned from artist Chaz Hutton to help savers, spenders and investors get to know their money better.

“As manager of YourFinances FC, here’s some thoughts for your financial play book to help you plan who to field and when,” the peer-to-peer lender said.  

Read more: Zopa adds two-factor authentication to beef up security

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The pictures describe debit cards as “the backbone of your team”, which are similar to cash – “a solid player on your team to get the job at hand done”.

Meanwhile, it describes credit cards as “your wallet’s most flexible players”.

“They can do a lot of jobs, but before you get them on the pitch it’s good to know how they work to keep your finances out of the relegation zone,” Zopa said.

Read more: Zopa plans £200m fundraise ahead of bank launch and IPO

The article also has a “when to play them” section using more football terminoligy, where it says that credit cards should be used “if you need reserves on the field” – meaning for a cash boost; “when you play a big set piece” – referring to the different add-ons that credit cards can offer such as cashback; “when you’re playing it safe” – referring to the fact that credit card purchases are usually insured; and “when you’re building up to something big” – explaining that responsible use of a credit card can improve your credit score if you’re considering a loan or mortgage.

Read more: Zopa survey finds Brits are more open about bank balance than Netflix password